Ludi Romani – Fun and games in Ancient Rome

September is not only the month that was dedicated to the Roman god of fire, Vulcan, in Ancient Rome – it was also a time for fun and games!

roman-4086570_1280
Chariot racing

From 12-14 September the original Ludi Romani (Roman Games) took place, until the Ancient Romans decided they were having such a good time, the festival was extended to 5-19 September, with an extra day added on 4 September to mark the untimely passing of Julius Caesar. It is thought public games  first took place in 249 BC.

handmaidens-747493_1280
Handmaidens kick off the celebrations

The games were not necessarily an annual event – often they were to mark a military campaign, such as the Punic Wars. The games were religious and dedicated to the God Jupiter – a procession from the Temple dedicated to Jupiter (on 13 September 509 BC) kicked off the events, which were held at the Circus Maximus by the Colosseum.

IMG_1274

Some emperors decided to hold the games to mark other events – in AD 47, Claudius decided to mark the eight-hundredth birthday of Rome with public games. Public games helped boost morale and social cohesion – they were as much a public relations strategy as a religious festival.

 

IMG_0774
Gladiator central – The Colosseum

Events at the Ludi Romani

So what could you expect if attending the Ludi Romani? Well, chariot races, naturally – along with displays of equine skills, some gloves-off boxing tournaments, animal hunts – and the chance to shake a leg in the dancing events.

IMG_2636
Slingshot champion David in action against Goliath, Borghese Museum

It is also thought that drama was also introduced for the first time during the Ludi Romani, with plays based on the drama of Ancient Greece.

roman-4436335_1280
Terrible time to lose a contact lens

The games were for the people and there were different kinds of games – Ludi Plebeian (games for the plebs), Ludi Saeculares (Secular Games). From time to time new games were introduced – such as the Ludi Ceriales in 202 BC, dedicated to the goddess Ceres.

IMG_0593
Statue of Ceres, Piazza del Popolo

Floralia is another festival that was celebrated – the Ludi Florae took place between 27/28 April and 3 May. Excitingly, they featured gladiator fights, theatrical shows, circuses – and nude dancing events. When in Rome.

sicily-1191530_1280
I’ll go nude if you will…

It is thought public games in Ancient Rome were last celebrated on a grand scale on the 1,000th anniversary of the founding of Rome in AD248.

Buon viaggio!

 

Want to go to Rome now?

Rome Alone DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL (3)ROME AGAIN DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAILVerona Alone DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL (2)Verona Again DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

 

Set off to the Eternal City from the comfort of your sofa with the ROME ALONE series of novels.

ROME ALONE & ROME AGAIN

In ROME ALONE, join unhappy housewife Bee and Alzheimer’s researcher Dr Neil McCarthy as they set off from opposite ends of the UK for a weekend in Rome, in an attempt to forget their marital woes. However, what happens in Rome will change their lives forever.

In ROME AGAIN, join them three years’ later when another trip to Rome begins to reveal the dark forces at work on their first trip, which they did not suspect.

VERONA ALONE & VERONA AGAIN

The story continues in VERONA ALONE and VERONA AGAIN, when newly divorced cellist Moira marks her first holiday as a single woman by visiting the summer opera season in Verona. There a generous American takes her under his wing, but is not all he seems.

In VERONA AGAIN, Moira returns to the city of love in pursuit of a ghost she must lay to rest.

DOWNLOAD THE ROME ALONE SERIES

Rome Alone DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL (3)ROME AGAIN DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

Download ROME ALONE

Download ROME AGAIN

 

Verona Alone DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL (2)Verona Again DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

Download VERONA ALONE

Download VERONA AGAIN

The novels have adult themes, sexual content – and dancing in various states of undress.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s